I am sure we have all made our usual New Year?s resolutions. Yes, yes, this year we shall lose some weight. By the way, how much have you lost since last year?

If we all resolved to be kinder with each other, and to ourselves, resolutions would be much easier to keep. Let me tell you about a random act of kindness. It ties in with my last newsletter and your very kind comments.

On December 22nd I was lying in bed at the Etobicoke General hospital on the 8th floor. They wheeled in an elderly lady with about eight Muslims in tow who included her children and grandchildren. The lady was still groggy from her surgery, so she was not talking, but the children did quietly amongst themselves. About ten minutes later they bade farewell to the lady and had to pass my bed to get out into the corridor. As they stood at the foot of my bed, smiling, I said Salam Alaykum (?????? ?????) which is the most elegant way of saying hello in Arabic. They lit up and immediately gave the proper response. The lady?s son asked if I was Muslim. I said No, I am Christian. He leaned on to my bed, took my right hand with both of his and wished me Merry Christmas. Immediately, all seven of his relatives followed with Christmas greetings of their own.

It was very touching and I think it would be a better use of our energies to resolve to perform more random acts of kindness this year. They can begin in such simple ways:

- Acknowledge a job well done when your hair is perfectly coiffed, your lawn mowed or your snow shovelled.

- Let you superior know about the employee who went out of his way to help a client, customer or co-worker.

- Hold the elevator open for one extra moment to allow one more person aboard.

- Offer to carry a senior citizen?s shopping bag or help a new mother carry the baby?s stroller up the subway stairs.

- Smile at the first person you see who looks least likely to smile back. They are the ones who need it most.

 

Upcoming Events

International Business Etiquette
Saturday, January 26, 2013
100 Dowling Avenue, Toronto

Teen Etiquette
Saturday, February 9, 2013
100 Dowling Avenue, Toronto

 

What People are Saying

You address timely concerns in a clear, concise and succinct manner, which is always appreciated, and so far as “Being politically correct should not be confused with being polite” — so true! Thank you for sharing your grace and wisdom. I am proud to call you my friend.

Merry Christmas!
Jodi Blackwood

 

Really enjoyed reading your latest Newsletter and I agree that we all are afraid to say Merry Christmas, Christmas Tree, Christmas period… All my clients tell me Merry Christmas and I in turn do the same to almost everyone I see.

So I would like to wish you and yours a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

Andre Gillezeau
Power Lesson

 

Hello Adeodata – and MERRY CHRISTMAS!!

You are absolutely right! Denial by the majority to demonstrate cultural sensitivity to the diverse minorities is just plain bad thinking. Regardless of how you try, you will exclude significant swaths of clients with that communication strategy and I am sure, that is not the intention.

And, as far as big corporations go… pretending to be connected to different ethnic groups just seems a hollow sentiment. Corporate office folks, like those at the banks and Rogers buildings, really should try to understand their customers. I can’t imagine the tiny percentages of clients and staff relative to the entire population that uses or passes those locations who might be from those targeted communities, but I don’t think it would be far off to suggest that those messages are in the wrong places and being read by the wrong clients. Regional branches and service centers are the place to shine with community focused holiday/seasonal/glad tiding wishes. I wonder why companies still don’t get that.

Ari Berman

 

Hej k?ra Adeodata!

Bra predikan!— om att vara stolt ?ver sitt eget och att aktivt respektera andra och deras traditioner och bakgrund.? Viktiga fr?gor och n?dv?ndiga insikter i v?r allt mer ?ppna och globala v?rld.

Per Olof Carvell
Sweden

 

It really makes sense.? To the point as usual.

Eszter